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Showing 3 posts from September 2018.

CMS Requires Hospitals to Publish Standard Charges on the Internet

Section 2718(e) of the Public Health Service Act, which was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act, updated Medicare payment policies to require that "each hospital operating within the United States, for each year, establish (and update) and make public (in accordance with guidelines developed by the Secretary) a list of the hospital's standard charges for items and services provided by the hospital." CMS provided guidance for implementation and stated hospitals are required to make the list of their standard charges, or their policies for public access to the list, available upon inquiry. More ›

How a Recent Interpretation of the Wisconsin "Borrowing Statute" Will Affect Multi-State Healthcare Practices in Wisconsin

Wisconsin businesses, including physician groups, clinics, and hospitals, operating across state lines facing personal injury exposure should be aware of a recent Wisconsin Court of Appeals opinion defining a clear test to evaluate whether a claim is untimely: Paynter v. ProAssurance Ins. Co., No. 2017AP739 (Mar. 27, 2018). The newly defined test specifically affects medical malpractice claims alleging a misdiagnosis and others where the claimed injury becomes apparent only after the alleged negligent conduct. Even if the subject conduct occurred in Wisconsin, a Wisconsin court can "borrow" the statute of limitations from another state if such an injury occurs outside the State in certain instances. In this case, the court declared Wisconsin "borrows" another State's statute of limitations when the first instance of "greater harm," greater than that which existed at the time of the subject conduct, occurs outside of Wisconsin. More ›

Midlevel Health Care Providers in Illinois and the Physicians They Collaborate With Should Take Note of Recent Legislation Impacting Their Practice

Illinois Senate Bill 2904—signed into law as Public Act 100-605 in July 2018 and going into effect on January 1, 2019—will increase the number of physician assistants (PAs) with which a physician may collaborate from five to seven. It also creates an exception for services provided in a federal primary care health professional shortage area (HPSA)—in those areas with a HPSA score of 12 or greater, there is no statutory maximum on the number of PAs with which a physician may collaborate. The new legislation will also grant the Department the authority to discipline both physicians and physician assistants (under the relevant practice Acts) for (1) entering into an excessive number of written collaborative agreements resulting in an inability to adequately collaborate, and (2) the repeated failure to adequately collaborate with the collaborating provider. These changes are effective January 1. More ›

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